What Does “From Forth the Fatal Loins of These Two Foes” Indicate?

Related

Unique & Thoughtful Gifts for Your Bestie’s New Baby 

Nothing says “adult” more than the announcement of your...

Towing Services in the US by Cities

Here's a list of Towing Services in the US...

Noble Fabrics and Golden Embroidery: Discover HAFTINAUSA Luxury

In today's world, where fashion often follows the principle...

5 Reasons to Choose Phuket as your Next Holiday Destination

The world sure is a big place, with almost...

Flu Vaccination: Protecting Yourself and Others

In an age where preventive healthcare measures are important,...

Share

What Does “From Forth the Fatal Loins of These Two Foes” Indicate?In William Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet,” the statement “From forth the fatal loins of these two foes” informs to the audience that the unlucky offspring born to the two warring families, the Capulets and the Montagues, are fated or destined to fall in love and die as a result of it. “A pair of star-crossed lovers will take their lives…” concludes the next paragraph.

The chorus in Shakespeare’s classic romantic play speaks these lines in the prologue. The prologue is written in the form of a sonnet, a poetry form that often deals with themes of love and tragedy and was particularly popular in Shakespeare’s time in England.

Read More: What Does a 1:10 Scale Mean?