an ode to she-flesh: partially-found, intentionally bad poem

By SARAH CHEKFA you found her at the butcher’s shop. brazenly raw, impudently red, so stubbornly sinewy. at first, you salivated at the thought of carving her up, breaking her down to her irreducible parts. but she was so condescendingly, nauseatingly free that she began to offend you. you considered her brazen deadness impudence. didn’t she care that you had all the power? you were … Continue reading an ode to she-flesh: partially-found, intentionally bad poem

The Morals of Meat: reconciling cultural symbolism with environmental awareness

By ERIN LYNCH “Where’s the beef?” Meat… You’re right in liking it.” “Indispensable in every household.” “The yardstick of protein foods.” Meat advertisements in the 1950s solidified the role of beef as a staple food constituting an integral part of the American identity. During World War II, the USDA promoted rationing and also subsidized the poultry industry in an effort to conserve red meat for … Continue reading The Morals of Meat: reconciling cultural symbolism with environmental awareness

Stop Telling Me to Eat Less: language, obsession, and eating disorders

By Jessica Brofsky The NS1150: Introduction to Nutrition professor has a song he records and plays for the 575-person survey course. The chorus to what one might loosely call his “rap” repeats the line: “if you don’t need it, don’t eat it.” Long after I handed in my final exam and had forgotten the functions of the epiglottis and the specific benefits of soluble versus … Continue reading Stop Telling Me to Eat Less: language, obsession, and eating disorders

Extra Ex Machina: asian bodies as disposable, alien(ated) labor in American sci-fi

By Jeremiah Kim INT[ERIOR] HOUSE/CALEB’S BEDROOM – MORNING CALEB is woken by light flooding onto his face. The door to his room has been opened. Outside is the bright glass corridor CALEB sits up to see a GIRL entering his room. She looks Japanese. She’s stunningly pretty. And she doesn’t say anything. Just walks in, carrying a tray with a cafetiere, which she puts on … Continue reading Extra Ex Machina: asian bodies as disposable, alien(ated) labor in American sci-fi

Understanding the Sound and the Fury

an outsider’s look into the mythical world of the sorority rush

by ANNA ALISON BRENNER

Before I got to college, I couldn’t understand why anyone who wasn’t a “girly-girl” would join a sorority. The stereotype of prissy, Jewish American Princesses who slept on fluffy pink comforters and wore Juicy tracksuits everywhere was far too engrained in my head—by the media, and god knows what else[1]—for me to possibly imagine any alternative.

And then I came to Cornell. Continue reading “Understanding the Sound and the Fury”

Lulu is Fucked Up, Let Us Count the Ways

by ANNA A. BRENNER and KAITLYN TIFFANY

Lulu, self-dubbed the “first-ever app for girls,” allows women to rate men that they know by syncing the app with their Facebook accounts and categorizing them as “ex-boyfriend, crush, together, hooked-up, friend, or relative.” In a multiple-choice quiz, women compartmentalize the dude in question by his sexual capability, appearance, personality, and a range of miscellany—from cooking skills to his sense of humor. The answers to these questions are amalgamated into a one-through-ten rating system. At the end of the quiz, girls can sort through an array of pre-written hashtags that range from complimentary (#4.0GPA) to sexual (#KinkyInTheRightWays), cautionary (#TotalF***ingDickhead) to random (#GrowsHisOwnVegetables). Continue reading “Lulu is Fucked Up, Let Us Count the Ways”