Urban Flavors: religion and urbanization in the Middle East

By Lela Robinson For those with sophisticated palettes, I recommend the urbanism.  Not an obvious choice, but if you’re an erudite progressive who enjoys the bitter taste of sophistication over the hearty flavors of reality, I can assure you, you would like nothing less. It’s on the side, under feminism and above Marxism. Don’t bother reading the description, or do exactly that and fake an understanding. … Continue reading Urban Flavors: religion and urbanization in the Middle East

Dismantling America’s Immigrant Fetish: how rabid anti-xenophobics can still be dicks

By Jeremiah Kim SCENE: A pho restaurant. Amidst the streams of sweat, spit, and speech spilling out between steaming bowls of hot brown broth, a table for two sits silent and spotless. LOVER: So uh…it says in your bio that you speak two languages… (Leans forward conspiratorially.) Does that you mean you’re like…not from here? BELOVED: Well, I moved to New York six months ago. … Continue reading Dismantling America’s Immigrant Fetish: how rabid anti-xenophobics can still be dicks

I Am Gagged: a lesson we can learn from America’s sixth president

By Angelina Shi In 1824, Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams ran for president. At the start, it seemed Adams was the likely winner; he was the son of a previous president and a former secretary of state with a brilliant international relations background. He was Harvard-educated, while Jackson could barely spell. It didn’t seem like a competition. Wrong. Though Jackson won 43 percent of … Continue reading I Am Gagged: a lesson we can learn from America’s sixth president

In Conversation with CGSU Organizer Sena Aydin

By Nicole Oliviera At the beginning of the spring semester, I sat down to interview Sena Aydin, a third-year graduate student studying Anthropology and a member of Cornell Graduate Students United (CGSU). CGSU was founded in 2014 as a union of graduate students committed to improving working conditions at Cornell. Its members advocate for the recognition of graduate students as workers and are united by … Continue reading In Conversation with CGSU Organizer Sena Aydin

Don’t Build a Bigger Jail…just stop filling it

By Aurora Rojer The Tompkins County Jail is overcrowded. It was built to hold 64 people, but, thanks to a variance from the State Commission of Corrections (SCOC), for the past few years it has been allowed to cram in an extra 18 people. This was the case until July 2016 when the SCOC hit Tompkins County with an ultimatum: the variance is gone; Tompkins … Continue reading Don’t Build a Bigger Jail…just stop filling it

The Dark Side of Donations: no thanks, Mui Ho: our fine arts library is just fine

By Nadya Mikhaylovskaya We are used to thinking about donations as helpful acts supporting socially useful causes—for example, buying Girl Scout cookies, investing in higher education for women in Third World countries, being a blood donor, or sponsoring the construction of new hospitals. Private universities, too, rely heavily on donations. Many expensive buildings (think Gates, Klarman) are built on Cornell’s campus, and different departments acquire … Continue reading The Dark Side of Donations: no thanks, Mui Ho: our fine arts library is just fine

[Insert Celebrity Name Here] is Not an Activist: capitalizing on activi$m really $ucks

by Anna Godek The question of celebrity culture and what role it should play in our lives is highly debated. Part of the reason that celebrities hold sway in our culture is that many of them are also artists whose work has the power to affect our lives and be meaningful. And art is certainly worth analyzing and discussing. However, we should also consider what … Continue reading [Insert Celebrity Name Here] is Not an Activist: capitalizing on activi$m really $ucks

Was Cassian Andor Anything Like Me? Negotiating Mexicanity in Star Wars

by Viri Garcia I grew up watching minorities and characters of color die on screen. Most often, these were African Americans. Every time my mom and I would watch a movie with African American characters, such as Scary Movie, The Shining, Resident Evil: Extinction, Kill Bill, and X-Men: First Class, I remember my mother saying, “Mira, se va a morir primero,” They are going to … Continue reading Was Cassian Andor Anything Like Me? Negotiating Mexicanity in Star Wars

Why Am I Watching This? musings on niche competition shows

By Olivia Bono Sitting at home this past winter break, I stared half-interested at the screen as my dad flicked through channels. Usually our go-to idle viewing is somewhere between the History Channel, TNT, or Syfy. This particular day we went with the History Channel. It’s not news that the History Channel has produced some weird TV, from Pawn Stars, the show about buying and … Continue reading Why Am I Watching This? musings on niche competition shows