Was Thoreau “Extra?”: or is that even the right question to ask?

By Sesha Kammula I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived. -Henry David Thoreau Extra is associated with excess. To have extra is to have more than strictly necessary, … Continue reading Was Thoreau “Extra?”: or is that even the right question to ask?

Name a Less Iconic Duo

art and article by Sarah Chefka Cornell University and your mental health Your emotional labor and the emotionally unavailable people to whom you devote it Fraternity culture and toxic masculinity The Student Assembly & its disappointing thoughts on Cornell Cinema An open table at Zeus and the time you willfully waste attempting to find one—time you will never get back, no matter how hard you … Continue reading Name a Less Iconic Duo

Your Question is Pork: Andrew takes the hog for a spin through Google Translate

By Andrew Peiser   Original But your question is what is a hog. Stop asking me. Just get in. A four-wheeled vehicle that’ll transport you from here to heaven. Wear a harness. My hog is a-purrin. What? Your head hurts like a hundred hogs. That’s tough. My hog gleams covered in tree rot. Can you handle it—hog don’t bite, but turn ye leafmeal need be. … Continue reading Your Question is Pork: Andrew takes the hog for a spin through Google Translate

Letter from the Editors

Progress This past year we’ve been saturated with rhetoric surrounding “progress.” Trump’s election was widely hailed as a “step backwards,” undoing the years of positive change that allowed Hillary Clinton to declare that “America is already great.” But this semester kitsch wonders: have we really been moving forward? Can we even conceive of history as linear? Jeremiah Kim questions whether the liberal embrace of immigrants … Continue reading Letter from the Editors

There is literally no such thing as good English: on rejecting “standard american english” and embracing language change

By Jagravi Dave The way we speak ties us to where we’re from. Our speech is infused with linguistic markers, some extraordinarily salient and others more subtle, that identify us as coming from particular places so significantly that The New York Times was able to create a dialect quiz for the United States that identifies, based on self-reporting, the very town to which someone’s speech … Continue reading There is literally no such thing as good English: on rejecting “standard american english” and embracing language change

The Paradox of the Bong Woman: class divide and feminism in Bangladesh

By Nuha Fariha A quick Google search of Bengali women, or “Bong” women as they’re colloquially referred to, reveals an interesting picture. Bong women are portrayed as daring, well-read, cultured feminists, partiers, and foodies. In other words, it reveals the perfect reflection of the myth I’d been told growing up. Out of all the countries in South Asia, Bangladesh is hailed to be the most … Continue reading The Paradox of the Bong Woman: class divide and feminism in Bangladesh

Why Are You So Obsessed with Me? the conventional wisdom of social media

By Viri Garcia I confess that I’m on social media most of the day, but I promise it’s not for reasons you would expect. I don’t go on social media to retweet, repost, like, and share things. I go on there to laugh. To laugh at what we’ve become, while I quietly panic on the inside and wonder where we went wrong. Part of the answer … Continue reading Why Are You So Obsessed with Me? the conventional wisdom of social media

Alternative Structures of Government: a conversation with Eastern Farm Workers Association

By Sophia May It may be time to admit that our system is failing us. Economically, our representatives continue to support policies that increase the broad income gap between the wealthy few and the impoverished many. This is perpetuated by a political system under which representation is skewed so that companies can make contributions to political candidates’ campaigns on such a scale that candidates are beholden … Continue reading Alternative Structures of Government: a conversation with Eastern Farm Workers Association

The L-Bench: a seat for Newton’s alt-boys

By Sophie Galowitz While many people expect political tension over Thanksgiving break, I thought I would be returning home to my oasis of liberal consensus in Newton, Massachusetts. I remembered that even as the national conversation exploded in the spring of 2016, in this very liberal Boston suburb, my high school’s mock primary debates were argued with smug irony: “Marco Rubio” and “Ted Cruz” going at … Continue reading The L-Bench: a seat for Newton’s alt-boys