I Am Gagged: a lesson we can learn from America’s sixth president

By Angelina Shi In 1824, Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams ran for president. At the start, it seemed Adams was the likely winner; he was the son of a previous president and a former secretary of state with a brilliant international relations background. He was Harvard-educated, while Jackson could barely spell. It didn’t seem like a competition. Wrong. Though Jackson won 43 percent of … Continue reading I Am Gagged: a lesson we can learn from America’s sixth president

In Conversation with CGSU Organizer Sena Aydin

By Nicole Oliviera At the beginning of the spring semester, I sat down to interview Sena Aydin, a third-year graduate student studying Anthropology and a member of Cornell Graduate Students United (CGSU). CGSU was founded in 2014 as a union of graduate students committed to improving working conditions at Cornell. Its members advocate for the recognition of graduate students as workers and are united by … Continue reading In Conversation with CGSU Organizer Sena Aydin

Don’t Build a Bigger Jail…just stop filling it

By Aurora Rojer The Tompkins County Jail is overcrowded. It was built to hold 64 people, but, thanks to a variance from the State Commission of Corrections (SCOC), for the past few years it has been allowed to cram in an extra 18 people. This was the case until July 2016 when the SCOC hit Tompkins County with an ultimatum: the variance is gone; Tompkins … Continue reading Don’t Build a Bigger Jail…just stop filling it

Was Cassian Andor Anything Like Me? Negotiating Mexicanity in Star Wars

by Viri Garcia I grew up watching minorities and characters of color die on screen. Most often, these were African Americans. Every time my mom and I would watch a movie with African American characters, such as Scary Movie, The Shining, Resident Evil: Extinction, Kill Bill, and X-Men: First Class, I remember my mother saying, “Mira, se va a morir primero,” They are going to … Continue reading Was Cassian Andor Anything Like Me? Negotiating Mexicanity in Star Wars

The Ungraspable Light: poetry and the myth of progress

By Jessie Brofsky There’s a room in the Tate Modern museum in London that displays contemporary art about destruction. On one side is a steel model of a basic apartment building, a rectangle built up and not out. On the other side are photographs depicting the stages of cities falling to the ground in clouds of smoke and debris. In another room is a tower … Continue reading The Ungraspable Light: poetry and the myth of progress

Sisyphean Speech: words, sounds, and reconciliation

By Andrew Peiser At thirteen, my life irrevocably changed. I was on the cusp of puberty. My broad shoulders and lush beard would soon dispel boyhood. For now, I walked in awkwardness from class to class. Once a week was speech therapy. After a deaf infancy was corrected by surgery, I could not speak comprehensible sounds. My mouth’s muscles were lax. Around the age of … Continue reading Sisyphean Speech: words, sounds, and reconciliation

Many Miles to Go for Public Service: Why Spring Break Just Won’t Cut It

By Chris Skawski Cornell University, a land grant college, is tasked with disseminating the knowledge it accumulates to the community that surrounds it. It has a state-mandated duty to employ its vast resources and research in order to implement community-centered programs. It accomplishes this primarily through its series of Cooperative Extension offices, located in over 50 counties across New York State. Cornell students, however, are … Continue reading Many Miles to Go for Public Service: Why Spring Break Just Won’t Cut It

Why Are We So Obsessed with Hillary Clinton’s ‘Authenticity’?

No, it’s not because of her emails By Katie O’Brien In 2015, Mitt Romney slammed Hillary Clinton during an MSNBC interview with the following criticism: “When you see her on stage or when she comes into a room full of people, she’s smiling with her mouth, but her eyes are saying, ‘Where’s my latte?’ It just doesn’t suggest that she believes in everything that she’s … Continue reading Why Are We So Obsessed with Hillary Clinton’s ‘Authenticity’?

“Bathroom Bills” Are Fucked Up; Let Me Count The Ways

By Katie O’Brien Nearly a year after South Carolina had to be nationally shamed into removing the Confederate flag from the lawn of the state capitol building, North Carolina appears to be vying for the title of “Worst Carolina.” With the passage of HB2, North Carolina has mandated that in public buildings like schools and libraries, people must use the bathroom that corresponds with their assigned … Continue reading “Bathroom Bills” Are Fucked Up; Let Me Count The Ways