Final Girl Karla…Sort of: progress we’ve made in intersectional/non-white representations of girl power and female strength in the U.S. Teen Slasher horror genre.

By Christopher-James Llego Art by Abby Hailu The Final Girl (n): The virgin girl; the female protagonist; the girl who fights and kills the murderer; the one the audience roots on for during the final act of the film. List of Teen Slashers featuring a black Final Girl: I Still Know What You Did Last Summer (1998)* *Karla (Brandy Norwood) is NOT the protagonist of … Continue reading Final Girl Karla…Sort of: progress we’ve made in intersectional/non-white representations of girl power and female strength in the U.S. Teen Slasher horror genre.

Everyone Should be as Excited as I am for the Last Season of Pretty Little Liars: here’s five reasons why

By Aurora Rojer 1) They randomly fast-forwarded five years in the middle of last season and now everyone in the show is a grown-up. That obviously means more sex and drugs and alcohol (excellent). But it also means that the older fans (me) don’t feel like such losers watching a TV show about high schoolers. Aria and Ezra’s “teacher’s pet” relationship looks a lot uglier … Continue reading Everyone Should be as Excited as I am for the Last Season of Pretty Little Liars: here’s five reasons why

Biting Barbie’s Head Off: thoughts on how childhood play informs ideas about gender

art and article by Anna Lee I was a tomboy. I played with trucks, cars, trains, and Tinkertoys. I enjoyed making toxic goop out of household materials and putting my concoctions in the freezer for my mother to find. I didn’t like Barbie dolls. I made two failed attempts at ballet and tap dancing; I quit after the first class, just a clumsy freckle-faced kid … Continue reading Biting Barbie’s Head Off: thoughts on how childhood play informs ideas about gender

Diary of a West Coast Girl: living a new double life

By Elise Cording Alternate universe. Summer camp. Station on the moon. These are all words I’ve either heard or used myself to describe the strange world encompassing a little more than one square mile: Cornell. A few months ago, I moved cross-country from California to New York, but I didn’t move fully. I left half of my personal belongings, all of my family, and a … Continue reading Diary of a West Coast Girl: living a new double life

Sisyphean Speech: words, sounds, and reconciliation

By Andrew Peiser At thirteen, my life irrevocably changed. I was on the cusp of puberty. My broad shoulders and lush beard would soon dispel boyhood. For now, I walked in awkwardness from class to class. Once a week was speech therapy. After a deaf infancy was corrected by surgery, I could not speak comprehensible sounds. My mouth’s muscles were lax. Around the age of … Continue reading Sisyphean Speech: words, sounds, and reconciliation

Kids Are Sexual Beings Too!: curiosity, taboo, and innocence

By Keyra Navas Embracing one’s sexuality is usually considered a loss of innocence. The sexual realm is still one that is “deserving” of shame and criticism. This is not surprising, considering that sexual activity is represented in mass media in erotic and lustful ways. As a result, it is challenging to unsee sexual expression as a vulgar propensity, let alone affiliate it with childhood. Because … Continue reading Kids Are Sexual Beings Too!: curiosity, taboo, and innocence

Scholastic So White: why we need diverse children’s books

By Kelly Stone When I was a kid, I didn’t have great taste in books. My choices were dictated by whatever looked good at the Scholastic book fair in school that year—books that tended to be about girls my age and whose appearances were similar to mine. I spent a good six years or so reading nearly identi- cal books, and never once did I … Continue reading Scholastic So White: why we need diverse children’s books

The Modern Bechdel Test

By Gaela LaPasta The Modern Bechdel Test  In 1985, the Bechdel Test was created to test if a movie could simply portray a woman as a human being. In 2017, we still rejoice when a movie passes said test, although few blockbusters and big budget films manage to. According to Dykes to Watch Out For, the comic strip where the Bechdel Test originated, a film … Continue reading The Modern Bechdel Test

Commodifying the Human Experience

By Gaby Leung It infuriates me seeing an entire group of friends on their phones instead of talking to one another. With bowed heads and fingers flying, they make me wonder what is so important on their devices that they can’t take the time to interact with each other for more than a few minutes. Social media connects people across the globe and allows them … Continue reading Commodifying the Human Experience