Being Habesha in a Black and White World: A Racial Identity Crisis

By Abigail Mengesha Racial identity was never a problem when I lived in Ethiopia. I recognized and understood my ethnicity, and that was enough. However, once I moved to the United States to receive higher education, questions regarding my racial background and the meaning of the term “Habesha” resurfaced. This spark in curiosity can be credited to my exposure to the American Black/white binary model … Continue reading Being Habesha in a Black and White World: A Racial Identity Crisis

Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Godlessness: are church and state really separate in the law?

By Michael Alban As easy as it is to comment on the spectacle that is Donald Trump,    we seem to have forgotten that he does not have a monopoly on the curious and sometimes questionable aspects of our presidential race. While much of Trump’s antics are unique to him as an individual and his attempt to achieve what he apparently thinks is best, other candidates … Continue reading Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Godlessness: are church and state really separate in the law?

Politics or Reality TV? Debates are nothing but profit motivated media spectacles

 by Aelya Ehtasham and Yana Makuwa   The stage. The bright lights. The crowds that conduct themselves like they’re, according to Bret Baier, “somewhere between a library and a Red Wings game.” These elements of the debates seem to call for an introduction like “This season, on the Presidential Race!” After all, the news media has decided that the American people find entertaining reality TV … Continue reading Politics or Reality TV? Debates are nothing but profit motivated media spectacles

Invisible: the silenced voices of undocumented south asian refugees

by Nuha Fariha “If they do decide to take me in [to custody] and send me back, they might as well just send my dead body back, because it’s about the same thing.” That is what refugee Jahed Ahmed told The Nation from his cell at an El Paso Detention Center. The 27-year-old is one of the 159 Bengali refugees who have fled political crisis … Continue reading Invisible: the silenced voices of undocumented south asian refugees

The New Nest of Campaign Donations

Twitter forces its way into the political funding game By Sarah Chekfa This past September, Twitter took a decisive step towards politicizing its platform, introducing a function that allows users to directly donate money to candidates’ political campaigns with a solitary tweet. Before I begin criticizing Twitter for its subliminal destruction of the rationalistic foundations of our political donation system, surely you’re wondering—how does this … Continue reading The New Nest of Campaign Donations

Exit Lawrence Lessig

A lost battle in the war of campaign finance reform By Nathaniel Coderre I’d been having debates with friends about why Colbert wasn’t the same on The Late Show for two months until the reason crystalized perfectly for me with one segment on November 5th. It was an installment of his “Hungry for Power Games” segment, which he uses every time someone drops out of … Continue reading Exit Lawrence Lessig

No Se Puede Mirar

Photography of agony and the western gaze By Kira Roybal On September 2nd of this year, images of Alan Kurdi, the young boy whose body was found washed up on the shore of Bodrum in Turkey, began to circulate. Journalists from across the news media, as well as politicians and human rights group leaders, tweeted and retweeted the photograph, captured by Doğan News Agency’s Nilufer … Continue reading No Se Puede Mirar

Cyber Shame and Instant Fame

Monica Lewinsky on Cyberbullying By Katie O’Brien Until last year, I’d never really given much thought to what it’s like to be Monica Lewinsky. As someone too young to remember her original capitulation into infamy, “Monica Lewinsky” was just a name I heard sometimes in jokes, a symbol referring to Bill Clinton’s scandal and impeachment, a pop culture reference evoking an image of promiscuity. But … Continue reading Cyber Shame and Instant Fame

Just Say No

Opting out of the tyranny of testing By Aurora Rojer Across the country, hundreds of thousands of parents are sending letters to their superintendents informing them that standardized testing has gotten out of control, and enough is enough. They are taking direct action in the form of civil disobedience: Their child will not be taking the new Common Core standardized tests. In just New York … Continue reading Just Say No

Next Episode Playing In… To Be Determined

The future of the internet in Cuba By Alejandra Alvarez The past few months have shown incredible changes in relations between the United States and Cuba. When the news broke of President Obama’s intention to lift the American trade embargo on Cuba, several Cuban-Americans believed the announcement to be a long overdue step in the right direction, moving the countries toward friendlier negotiations and a … Continue reading Next Episode Playing In… To Be Determined