Many Miles to Go for Public Service: Why Spring Break Just Won’t Cut It

By Chris Skawski Cornell University, a land grant college, is tasked with disseminating the knowledge it accumulates to the community that surrounds it. It has a state-mandated duty to employ its vast resources and research in order to implement community-centered programs. It accomplishes this primarily through its series of Cooperative Extension offices, located in over 50 counties across New York State. Cornell students, however, are … Continue reading Many Miles to Go for Public Service: Why Spring Break Just Won’t Cut It

Thirteen and Thriving: A Tale of Two Tweens

By Elise Cording The subtleties of human contact have never been better contemplated than they were in the tumultuous days of middle school. A potato chip shared during recess could be a token of utmost romantic attraction, a brief moment of eye contact from across the room a declaration of love, and physical contact the pinnacle of relationship success. My first relationship, attempted with a … Continue reading Thirteen and Thriving: A Tale of Two Tweens

What it Means to Be Thirteen in the Age of the Selfie

By Annika Bjerke Since the introduction of Facebook in 2004, the past twelve years have been a whirlwind of social media. You have the popular platforms — Instagram, Snapchat, Twitter — as well as the alternative Tumblr, where, according to my thirteen-year-old sister Lilly, confused pre-teens develop their “aesthetic.” My first tryst with social media occurred when I joined Facebook at the ripe age of … Continue reading What it Means to Be Thirteen in the Age of the Selfie

White Girls Watching Lena: What We Can Learn From Dunham’s Flawed Public Feminism

By Jael Goldfine I’ve never known what to think about Lena Dunham—what to make of her, how to speak about her, how to relate myself to her, or whether I should at all. As a millennial woman, I’ve felt obligated to have an opinion about Lena Dunham—a strong one—but have skated by with a variety of mumbled, non-comments, requested mostly by women whose opinion I … Continue reading White Girls Watching Lena: What We Can Learn From Dunham’s Flawed Public Feminism

Art by Maura Thomas

Emoji Unease: What Gets Lost in Pictoral Communication

By Keyra Navas Using the restroom is not a solitary ritual for me—that is to say, like many of my fellow youths, I sit on the throne with my cellphone in hand. Surprisingly, I don’t really engage with my phone at other times of the day; but during trips to the restroom, my phone becomes more appealing. And as I seek brief entertainment through my … Continue reading Emoji Unease: What Gets Lost in Pictoral Communication

Don’t Call Me Kitsch-Mael: On Misspelled Names

By Carina Chien If you’ve ever walked into a Starbucks, dead from exams and homework assignments, you’ll automatically feel at home in that community of languishing souls. Even as Ithaca’s water supply diminishes, you’ll notice them drowning their sorrows and ability to sleep in a cup of coffee that’s suspiciously never empty. But screw the environment as long as it’s for the aesthetic of tragedy, … Continue reading Don’t Call Me Kitsch-Mael: On Misspelled Names

Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Godlessness: are church and state really separate in the law?

By Michael Alban As easy as it is to comment on the spectacle that is Donald Trump,    we seem to have forgotten that he does not have a monopoly on the curious and sometimes questionable aspects of our presidential race. While much of Trump’s antics are unique to him as an individual and his attempt to achieve what he apparently thinks is best, other candidates … Continue reading Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Godlessness: are church and state really separate in the law?

Learning from the West: What I’m missing from my liberal arts education

By Jagravi Dave   This began as a questioning of my hesitations. What was it about the education that I was receiving that made me so viscerally uncomfortable? It was a rejection I felt from somewhere within me: not a well-reasoned argument, but something instinctive and bodily. Why did it feel so strange for me to study these “classic” works, like those of Shakespeare? Was … Continue reading Learning from the West: What I’m missing from my liberal arts education

In community we trust: Alternative currencies in Ithaca and abroad

Confronting capitalism through alternative currencies By Aurora Rojer The world-renowned economist Bernard Lietaer states, “Money is an agreement within a community to use something as a medium of exchange.” In the United States, we use the dollar. It’s not backed by anything physical; we went off of the gold standard in 1971. So if money is just a medium of exchange that we’ve all agreed … Continue reading In community we trust: Alternative currencies in Ithaca and abroad

A Reaction To Facebook Reactions

Facebook responds to our clamoring for multifaceted validation By Sarah Chekfa Much like a scorned lover enacting jealousy-provoking Machiavellian schemes cunningly designed to capture your guilty attention, Facebook is tacitly begging us to react. The February release of its now-infamous “Reactions” feature suggests an attempt by the company to revive its now assuredly familiar interface vis-à-vis the purported complexity of the range of human emotion. Now, … Continue reading A Reaction To Facebook Reactions