How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love God: My Millenial Christian Education

By Stephen Meisel On Wednesdays, my high school’s cafeteria also functioned as a chapel. On one particular Wednesday, when I was about 13, the administration informed us that this week our chapel period would function a bit differently: in fact, it was quite the special occasion. This week, they said, our Chapel would be used to spread the Word of God at a prime upload … Continue reading How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love God: My Millenial Christian Education

Leaving the Vault: Townie-Gownie Relations in a Mutie-Normie Roleplaying Game

By Melvin Li The year is 2161. It has been close to a century since the United States, Soviet Union, China, and other global powers have extinguished almost all life on Earth after a two hour nuclear exchange on October 23, 2077. North America is a lifeless, radiated desert filled with bands of bloodthirsty raiders and hordes of ravenous mutants. The most dangerous threat in … Continue reading Leaving the Vault: Townie-Gownie Relations in a Mutie-Normie Roleplaying Game

My Belief is Their Superstition: Rethinking Belief Systems

By José Armando Fernández Guerrero “Hazte pa’alla.” “¿Mande?” “¡Que pongas los pies pa’ acá y la cabeza lejos de la puerta!” For some reason, my child self found pride in annoying his elders. In this scenario – a hallmark of my life as a little rascal – my mother commanded me to tuck myself in bed with my head as far as possible from the … Continue reading My Belief is Their Superstition: Rethinking Belief Systems

Origin Stories: An Interview with Kitsch Founders Katie Jentleson and Samantha Henig

Aurora and Jagravi: Hi! Katie: Hi! Sam: Katie? Hi! Katie: Hi! We never see each other anymore, this is nice! Sam: How’s it going? Aurora: Pretty good! We’re in layout week now, so things are definitely heating up. Katie: Oh nice, where do you guys do that now? Jagravi: In the basement of Willard Straight. Sam: Damn, they didn’t burn that place down once we … Continue reading Origin Stories: An Interview with Kitsch Founders Katie Jentleson and Samantha Henig

Finding Yourself in College: Fostering Identity Through Exploration

By Shaila Humane During the first few days in college, 3,000 disoriented students make a mad rush to find their footing after being plucked from a comfortable, settled home and plunged into a sudden unknown. Everything we’ve ever known has suddenly been taken from us—our familiar surroundings, our friends, our family, our routine. This sudden change often causes questions of identity and sparks the need … Continue reading Finding Yourself in College: Fostering Identity Through Exploration

Embracing Goldwin Smith: The Paradox of Klarman Hall’s History

By Adam Davis When I returned to Cornell this past spring semester, the landscape of Central Campus had been noticeably altered. The construction site that had been an evolving but constant presence since the beginning of my freshman year had finally given way to a finished building. Klarman Hall now stood as a new and conspicuous architectural presence on East Avenue. Klarman Hall was the … Continue reading Embracing Goldwin Smith: The Paradox of Klarman Hall’s History

Great Sexpectations: Disparities in Sex Education and Freshman Year

By Anna Lee At Speak About It!, an activist-performance that seeks to educate students and prevent sexual violence, hundreds of freshmen sat in Bailey Hall listening to sex-themed music before the show. I looked out at my new classmates—some on their phones, some talking to people in their rows, others sitting silently. In the performance, the actors talked candidly about sex and “hooking up” and … Continue reading Great Sexpectations: Disparities in Sex Education and Freshman Year

My Mom, The Ghostbuster

By Hannah Subega You would think that the typical honeymoon would be spent somewhere tropical, romantic, or at the very least, comfortable. So a bedroom in a supposedly haunted, centuries-old Scottish castle doesn’t really scream “honeymoon suite.” Alas, this was where my mother dragged my father after their wedding and it was a blast, at least according to her. Though she is a bit of … Continue reading My Mom, The Ghostbuster

Referendum Red: Reclaiming ‘That Time of the Month’

By Jessie Brofsky I was fifteen when I first got my period, and I thought I was cursed. I cried myself to sleep that night, knowing every month I would feel like a brick had been shoved into my abdomen. Thus was my introduction to menstruation, and I never spoke about it. Out of an almost paralytic self-consciousness, I find I can’t even buy tampons … Continue reading Referendum Red: Reclaiming ‘That Time of the Month’

Art by Aurora Rojer

Naked Frisbee: The State of Top Freedom at Cornell

By Gaela LaPasta Before I moved into Risley Hall, my Freshman year at Cornell, I had no idea that I had any desire to be casually topless. As a child, I ran around the house, the beach, the pool topless. When I grew up a little and being topless in public stopped being acceptable, I never questioned it. My brothers and every other male I … Continue reading Naked Frisbee: The State of Top Freedom at Cornell