Scholastic So White: why we need diverse children’s books

By Kelly Stone When I was a kid, I didn’t have great taste in books. My choices were dictated by whatever looked good at the Scholastic book fair in school that year—books that tended to be about girls my age and whose appearances were similar to mine. I spent a good six years or so reading nearly identi- cal books, and never once did I … Continue reading Scholastic So White: why we need diverse children’s books

The Modern Bechdel Test

By Gaela LaPasta The Modern Bechdel Test  In 1985, the Bechdel Test was created to test if a movie could simply portray a woman as a human being. In 2017, we still rejoice when a movie passes said test, although few blockbusters and big budget films manage to. According to Dykes to Watch Out For, the comic strip where the Bechdel Test originated, a film … Continue reading The Modern Bechdel Test

Hey There Nostalgia: Revisiting Middle School Music

By Olivia Bono In the age of YouTube and Spotify, we can listen to any song we want from any era. So why is it that when we hear our favorite middle school jams in Okenshields—be they “Stereo Hearts,” “Dynamite,” or even “Cotton Eye Joe”—we drop everything (except maybe our trays of fried rice because we really don’t want to have to go through that … Continue reading Hey There Nostalgia: Revisiting Middle School Music

Television as Text: Confronting Realities in Donald Glover’s Atlanta

By Jacque Groskaufmanis I watched the first episode of Atlanta in the Fine Arts library, sitting next to a literal Greek statue and a fancy, old-timey map of 1970’s Manhattan. Donald Glover’s show portrays the city of Atlanta and the vibrancy and violence that exist within it. The scenes are emphasized in an unsettling way, set against the background of the ivory tower that is … Continue reading Television as Text: Confronting Realities in Donald Glover’s Atlanta

Art in the Internet Age: An Analysis of www.Billlwurtz.com

By Nathaniel LaCelle-Peterson It is with little fanfare that the Internet has seeped into the day-to-day routine of life. It is a quiet medium that regurgitates pictures of my friends smiling and pointing at waterfalls or platefuls of chicken-waffles, the day’s news, the day’s think pieces about yesterday’s news, and the vague affirmation of strangers quantified in likes, “wows,” and retweets. There’s rarely a waking … Continue reading Art in the Internet Age: An Analysis of www.Billlwurtz.com

Commodifying the Human Experience

By Gaby Leung It infuriates me seeing an entire group of friends on their phones instead of talking to one another. With bowed heads and fingers flying, they make me wonder what is so important on their devices that they can’t take the time to interact with each other for more than a few minutes. Social media connects people across the globe and allows them … Continue reading Commodifying the Human Experience

Being Habesha in a Black and White World: A Racial Identity Crisis

By Abigail Mengesha Racial identity was never a problem when I lived in Ethiopia. I recognized and understood my ethnicity, and that was enough. However, once I moved to the United States to receive higher education, questions regarding my racial background and the meaning of the term “Habesha” resurfaced. This spark in curiosity can be credited to my exposure to the American Black/white binary model … Continue reading Being Habesha in a Black and White World: A Racial Identity Crisis

Shaving Off Gender Norms: The Politics of Beauty and Body Hair

By Fauna Mahootian Puberty is a very vulnerable time for many. We begin feeling self-conscious as insecurities start forming and intensifying. It’s also a time when our hormones cause us to grow more hair. The media perpetuates the expectation for women to be hairless, so it’s not surprising that girls start feeling self-conscious about their body hair and want to get rid of it. For … Continue reading Shaving Off Gender Norms: The Politics of Beauty and Body Hair

Vampires, Werewolves, and… the Economy? The Effects of the Twilight Saga on Local Economies in Washington State

By Magdalene Murphy At the top of the Olympic Peninsula, that dark and rainy spit of land that sticks out from the westernmost edge of the continental United States, sits the unremarkable town of Forks, Washington. It is unremarkable, of course, except for being the backdrop to one of the biggest pop culture stories of the past decade: The Twilight Saga. It’s also located in … Continue reading Vampires, Werewolves, and… the Economy? The Effects of the Twilight Saga on Local Economies in Washington State

Thirteen and Online: Growing Up in Video Game Communities

I grew up on online videogames. It began with a game called Blockland, where you played as a little Lego man who could walk around and build stuff out of blocks among other little Lego men doing the same. As a default, the game contained practically no rules. For instance, I could acquire preposterously overpowered rocket launcher as a little Lego man but I was … Continue reading Thirteen and Online: Growing Up in Video Game Communities