There is literally no such thing as good English: on rejecting “standard american english” and embracing language change

By Jagravi Dave The way we speak ties us to where we’re from. Our speech is infused with linguistic markers, some extraordinarily salient and others more subtle, that identify us as coming from particular places so significantly that The New York Times was able to create a dialect quiz for the United States that identifies, based on self-reporting, the very town to which someone’s speech … Continue reading There is literally no such thing as good English: on rejecting “standard american english” and embracing language change

Why Are You So Obsessed with Me? the conventional wisdom of social media

By Viri Garcia I confess that I’m on social media most of the day, but I promise it’s not for reasons you would expect. I don’t go on social media to retweet, repost, like, and share things. I go on there to laugh. To laugh at what we’ve become, while I quietly panic on the inside and wonder where we went wrong. Part of the answer … Continue reading Why Are You So Obsessed with Me? the conventional wisdom of social media

Urban Flavors: religion and urbanization in the Middle East

By Lela Robinson For those with sophisticated palettes, I recommend the urbanism.  Not an obvious choice, but if you’re an erudite progressive who enjoys the bitter taste of sophistication over the hearty flavors of reality, I can assure you, you would like nothing less. It’s on the side, under feminism and above Marxism. Don’t bother reading the description, or do exactly that and fake an understanding. … Continue reading Urban Flavors: religion and urbanization in the Middle East

Dismantling America’s Immigrant Fetish: how rabid anti-xenophobics can still be dicks

By Jeremiah Kim SCENE: A pho restaurant. Amidst the streams of sweat, spit, and speech spilling out between steaming bowls of hot brown broth, a table for two sits silent and spotless. LOVER: So uh…it says in your bio that you speak two languages… (Leans forward conspiratorially.) Does that you mean you’re like…not from here? BELOVED: Well, I moved to New York six months ago. … Continue reading Dismantling America’s Immigrant Fetish: how rabid anti-xenophobics can still be dicks

Why Am I Watching This? musings on niche competition shows

By Olivia Bono Sitting at home this past winter break, I stared half-interested at the screen as my dad flicked through channels. Usually our go-to idle viewing is somewhere between the History Channel, TNT, or Syfy. This particular day we went with the History Channel. It’s not news that the History Channel has produced some weird TV, from Pawn Stars, the show about buying and … Continue reading Why Am I Watching This? musings on niche competition shows

The Ungraspable Light: poetry and the myth of progress

By Jessie Brofsky There’s a room in the Tate Modern museum in London that displays contemporary art about destruction. On one side is a steel model of a basic apartment building, a rectangle built up and not out. On the other side are photographs depicting the stages of cities falling to the ground in clouds of smoke and debris. In another room is a tower … Continue reading The Ungraspable Light: poetry and the myth of progress

The Finsta-gram: where fake is real and real is kind of hilarious

by Jacque Groskaufmanis “What should I make my caption?” is a pretty common and innocuous thing that someone might ask before posting on Instagram. Even my friends with the most dedicatedly “I-don’t-care” aesthetics plan out their internet content with a layer of detail and attention that warrants the same crowdsourcing for captions. But on fake Instagram, there is no question like “what should I make my … Continue reading The Finsta-gram: where fake is real and real is kind of hilarious

Why We March: the story of three 20th Century Women

By Laura Kern 20th Century Women chronicles the lives of three women and a teenage boy growing up in Southern California in the changing political climate of the 1970s; the film debuted at the New York Film Festival in October, but its wide release in January brought it to the attention of viewers and awards shows alike. In the film, Dorothea (Annette Bening) is the … Continue reading Why We March: the story of three 20th Century Women

Biting Barbie’s Head Off: thoughts on how childhood play informs ideas about gender

art and article by Anna Lee I was a tomboy. I played with trucks, cars, trains, and Tinkertoys. I enjoyed making toxic goop out of household materials and putting my concoctions in the freezer for my mother to find. I didn’t like Barbie dolls. I made two failed attempts at ballet and tap dancing; I quit after the first class, just a clumsy freckle-faced kid … Continue reading Biting Barbie’s Head Off: thoughts on how childhood play informs ideas about gender

Kids Are Sexual Beings Too!: curiosity, taboo, and innocence

By Keyra Navas Embracing one’s sexuality is usually considered a loss of innocence. The sexual realm is still one that is “deserving” of shame and criticism. This is not surprising, considering that sexual activity is represented in mass media in erotic and lustful ways. As a result, it is challenging to unsee sexual expression as a vulgar propensity, let alone affiliate it with childhood. Because … Continue reading Kids Are Sexual Beings Too!: curiosity, taboo, and innocence