Hermione Granger Syndrome: work, wands, and insensitive warts

By Veronica Dickson La Rotta Hermione Granger syndrome (noun): wanting to throw yourself unabashedly and romantically into your academic passions while understanding it comes with inevitable peer-sanctioned disdain; being too extra in class. I’m not the first to have stared at my Harry Potter collection, wishing deeply I could conjure up Hermione and ask to sit next to her for a bit—just two girls who … Continue reading Hermione Granger Syndrome: work, wands, and insensitive warts

You’re Not Uncultured: the case against the homogenization of speech at Cornell

By Mikaela Hamilton Fairly soon after my arrival at Cornell two years ago, I began to feel that I was missing something—something that most of my peers seemed to have and that I’d never known myself to lack. Several days later, while talking on the phone with one of my friends from home, I found the word for those feelings: I simply felt “uncultured.” My … Continue reading You’re Not Uncultured: the case against the homogenization of speech at Cornell

Extra Ex Machina: asian bodies as disposable, alien(ated) labor in American sci-fi

By Jeremiah Kim INT[ERIOR] HOUSE/CALEB’S BEDROOM – MORNING CALEB is woken by light flooding onto his face. The door to his room has been opened. Outside is the bright glass corridor CALEB sits up to see a GIRL entering his room. She looks Japanese. She’s stunningly pretty. And she doesn’t say anything. Just walks in, carrying a tray with a cafetiere, which she puts on … Continue reading Extra Ex Machina: asian bodies as disposable, alien(ated) labor in American sci-fi

Laughing at the Movies: Mulholland Drive and the consequences of making a masterpiece

By Nathan Chazan I went to a screening of Mulholland Drive the other day. It’s a good movie by most people’s reckoning although it’s had the misfortune of being deemed canonically great. When a film becomes great, people start to watch it less, even if they go to see it. When we go to a canonical film, our experience of the work is predetermined to … Continue reading Laughing at the Movies: Mulholland Drive and the consequences of making a masterpiece

Embracing the Best of the Bad: The Room and why we love bad movies

By Anna Godek It was close to midnight on a late August night as I made my way to my seat in the movie theater, box of plastic spoons in hand. I was there to see a movie, and I was hoping it would be bad. Really bad. I wasn’t disappointed—it was terrible. I was there to see The Room, a movie so hilariously awful … Continue reading Embracing the Best of the Bad: The Room and why we love bad movies

When Politics Engulfs Criticism: do we over-account for political messaging in cinema?

By Lorenzo Benitez Among my favorite arts critics is Armond White, currently a writer for the National Review and Out, whose compelling, albeit controversial, voice is uniquely situated amidst contemporary film criticism. Most infamous for writing the first negative review of Toy Story 3 to appear on Rotten Tomatoes, White has, over the years, accumulated his own fair share of critics. For instance, White was … Continue reading When Politics Engulfs Criticism: do we over-account for political messaging in cinema?

A World of Violence: the Yakuza films of Kinji Fukasaku

By Clarence Boyce Director Kinji Fukasaku, well-known for Battle Royale, did for the Yakuza genre what Francis Ford Coppola did for the gangster genre. From 1972 to 1976, Fukasaku directed several Yakuza films that showed a postwar Japan in a state of non-stop violence and brutality. Long gone were the days of honor, these new times called for unrepentant killing and unabashed displays of cruelty. … Continue reading A World of Violence: the Yakuza films of Kinji Fukasaku

The Art of the Rom-Com: love in the time of banality

By Gabriela Dickson La Rotta When did the world fall in love with the romantic comedy? Was it the moment in City Lights (1931) when the Flower Girl saw the Tramp for the first time? Perhaps when in Some Like It Hot (1959) Jack Lemmon finally tears off his wig and reveals that he is not Daphne to the indifference of his alarmingly persistent suitor? … Continue reading The Art of the Rom-Com: love in the time of banality

36 Facebook Groups and Counting: a tour of the weirdest corners of the web

By Viri Garcia One of my closest friends once said I’m “well-versed on the internet,” and he’s not wrong. Being active on several social media platforms ensures my exposure to plenty of content. I have been from the socially conscious and aesthetic pages of Tumblr to the icky, questionable corners of 4Chan and Reddit and back. I have seen things I wish I hadn’t, and … Continue reading 36 Facebook Groups and Counting: a tour of the weirdest corners of the web